Montag

Galileo's phases of the moon

From Wikipedia’s entry on Monday:

The English noun Monday derived sometime before 1200 from monedæi, which itself developed from Old English (around 1000) mōnandæg and mōndæg (literally meaning “moon‘s day”), which is cognate to other Germanic languages, including Old Frisian mōnadeig, Middle Low German and Middle Dutch mānendach (modern Dutch Maandag), Old High German mānetag (modern German Montag), and Old Norse mánadagr (Swedish and Norwegian nynorsk måndag. Danish and Norwegian bokmål mandag). The Germanic term is a Germanic interpretation of Latin lunae dies (“day of the moon”).[1]

In many Slavic languages the name of the day eschews pagan tradition and translates as “after Sunday/holiday” (Russian понедельник (poniediélnik), Polish poniedzialek. In Turkish it is called “pazartesi”, which means the day after Sunday. In most Indic languages, the word for Monday is dervied from Sanskrit Sōmavāra[2]. Japanese and Korean share the same ancient Chinese words … for Monday which means day of the moon.

In my language it just means “back to work.”

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